Home

Awesome

Leave a comment

Telephone

Telephone

Awesome

Leave a comment

blue_space_by_whendell-d79zabi

The Edwardian Cloakroom

2 Comments

Giant genitalia exhibited in former Bristol toilets

The Edwardian Cloakroom is a former toilet block that has been turned into a creative space

A former public toilet in Bristol is to be occupied by giant black velvet genitalia in the name of art.

People are invited to have their photo taken with the two sculptures at the Edwardian Cloakroom, which has been turned into a creative space.

These pictures will then be displayed on the surrounding walls.

Artist Claudio Ahlers said he hopes to tour the country with the exhibition – Portraits of Private Perception – which starts on Monday and lasts six days.

Mr Ahlers, together with Tilly May, Virginie Noel and Ellie Gray, will photograph visitors interacting with the 2.2m (7ft) tall sculptures – one in the former ladies’ toilet and one in the men’s.

‘Reflect intimate emotions’

“The exhibition will grow with each contribution from each sitter,” said Montpelier-based Mr Ahlers.

“While being photographed with the sculptures participants will be free to pose, sit and engage with the each sculpture in whatever way they like.

“The resulting photographs should reflect intimate emotions, playful interactions, personal perceptions and most importantly the depth of feelings towards the opposite sex and as well as feelings about one’s own gender.

“It is hoped that the honesty, beauty and intensity of the final photographs will reveal genuine insights into how we as women and as men view ourselves, our sexuality, our bodies as well as the opposite sex and more specifically the ones we fall in love with.

“Whatever is uncovered by each photograph will hopefully go beyond ideas and clichés as embodied by, for example, swear words, derogatory language or sexualised comedy and will instead be explored in the spirit of joy, affection and celebration.”

Each participant, who must be aged over 18, will receive a digital file of their selected photograph for personal use.

Visitors can also choose not to be photographed.

Lost and Gone Forever

2 Comments

Banksy wanted Clacton-on-Sea to confront racism

– instead it confronted him

Tendring district council has destroyed a painting that eloquently challenged views on immigration – was it too close to home?

‘If this Banksy picture scared anyone it must be because the pigeons’ views are just too close to real opinions in the air – the satire is so accurate that it can be mistaken for reality.’ Photograph: Universal News And Sport (Europe)

It must say something about the swirling currents of prejudice, fear and anger in modern Britain that even Banksy cannot predict their next bizarre lurch.

From Bristol to New York, this street artist has made his reputation by wittily mocking power and money. In Manhattan he satirised McDonald’s (not, perhaps his most original target) and in Cheltenham, near GCHQ, he painted spies snooping on a phone box. Usually people love him for it. The political content of Banksy’s art is generally so accepted and enjoyed that it has become tame. Far from being challenged, people gush at the prices it fetches.

It comes as a genuine shock, then, that a council has removed one of his paintings instead of calling in the valuers. Tendring district council says it destroyed the new painting that materialised in Clacton-on-Sea – where Tory defector Douglas Carswell is about to fight a byelection for his new party Ukip – after getting a complaint that it was “offensive and racist”. Was it?

Not in a million years. This is the best Banksy I have never seen: a clever and succinct satire on some currents of feeling in contemporary Britain, terrified of “migrants”, menaced by otherness. Far from being by any stretch of the imagination “racist”, it is – was – a witty putdown of the drab, dour vision of Britain touted by those who would push down diversity and hold back the tide of modern human movement.

A grumpy gang of grey pigeons aim their outrage at a beautiful green migratory swallow. “Migrants not welcome”, say their placards: “Go back to Africa”; “Keep off our worms.”

Did a member of the public really see these banners and take offence? If so, they misunderstood what is quite plainly an eloquent attack on racism.

The contrast between the ugly pigeons and the pretty swallow could hardly be starker or more telling. Plainly, we’re meant to be on the side of the swallow. Banksy has cleverly exploited two contrasting wall textures to put the pigeons and the swallow in contrasting worlds: the place where the pigeons are is not very attractive and yet they defend it brutally, to the last worm.

Clearly, the African swallow is not a threat but an enriching presence. It’s the “locals” who are grim. And the joke goes deeper. Banksy is pointing out that migration is not just a good thing – it is a natural fact. Migratory birds have been part of our landscape for a very long time. The little Britain defended by those who fear outsiders is an illusion – even the birds in our trees are citizens of the world.

This satire is in the tradition of Aesop’s fables or St. Francis of Assisi when he preached to the birds – it’s a lovely little vignette. For birds do not, of course, wave racist placards. Only humans do.

Source: TheGuardian Read more

Not Everyone Appreciates Art

2 Comments

Cleaner throws out ‘rubbish’ Sala Murat artwork

The cleaner unwittingly threw away works made of newspaper and cardboard which were part of the exhibition

A cleaner has mistakenly thrown away contemporary artworks meant to be part of an exhibition in southern Italy.

Works made out of newspaper and cardboard, and cookie pieces scattered across the floor as part of Sala Murat’s display were thrown out.

Lorenzo Roca, from cleaning firm Chiarissima, said the unnamed cleaner was “just doing her job”.

It later emerged the cleaner had handed them over to refuse collectors, thinking it was rubbish left behind by workers who set up the Mediating Landscape exhibition.

Read more

Read more

 

Unbelievable

2 Comments

The bizarre world of Hikaru Cho, a Japanese artist, who uses acrylics to paint weird and lifelike pictures on her human canvases.

Lifelike-Body-Art-10

Want to see more? Check out FavoriteThings

 

New Vincent Van Gogh painting identified

2 Comments

The painting will go on display on 24 September

A previously unknown landscape painting by Vincent van Gogh has been identified by the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.

Sunset at Montmajour – which depicts trees, bushes and sky – had spent years in a Norwegian private collector’s attic after he had been told the work was not by the Dutch master.

The museum said the painting was authenticated by letters, style and the physical materials used.

It is the first full-size canvas by Van Gogh discovered since 1928.

Museum director Axel Rueger called the discovery a “once-in-a-lifetime experience” at an unveiling ceremony.

He said the institution had previously rejected the painting’s authenticity in the 1990s partly because it was not signed.

However thanks to new research techniques and a two-year investigation, it concluded the artwork was by the artist.

000BBC_logo

Awesome

2 Comments

Unique-Photoshop-Art

Awesome PhotoShop

Rocks and Stuff

Leave a comment

sculpture_of_stone_1

Hirotoshi Itoh creates a funny sculpture made of stone.

See more: Todays Whisper

Surreal, but Not Dali

Leave a comment

Georgia-based photographer Taylor Marie McCormick, aka lalasiy, captures and manipulates images to reflect a surreal world one would find themselves entering just as they’re falling asleep. Equipped with her Nikon D800, the 19-year-old manages to creatively visualize an alternate universe where jellyfish rain down from the skies and tiny mermaids frolic in mason jars filled with water.

See more, read more: My Modern Met

 

Older Entries

%d bloggers like this: