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Is it time to leave… again?

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I have read several accounts that strongly suggest we (humans) are not from this planet. There is some evidence and conjecture that we may have come here from Mars after we had made the planet inhabitable, but that we aren’t even from there, but further afield. Suggesting the possibility that we are in fact a race of space nomads.

If we are not from here, that would explain why they can’t find the so called ‘missing link’ between us and apes; there isn’t one.

We have succeeded in stripping this planet and making it uninhabitable, is this why we are searching so far and wide in the galaxies at great expense to find the next port of call?

solongandthanksforallthefish

Was Douglas Adams spoof ‘Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy‘ terribly far off the mark? “So long and thanks for all the fish!”

Maybe we’ve found our next home…

Star is crowded by super-Earths

An impression of what the sky might look like from the exoplanet Gliese 667Cd, looking towards the parent star and featuring, at top, the other super-Earths in the habitable zone

Scientists have identified three new planets around a star they already suspected of hosting a trio of worlds.

It means this relatively nearby star, Gliese 667C, now has three so-called super-Earths orbiting in its “habitable zone”.

This is the region where temperatures ought to allow for the possibility of liquid water, although no-one can say for sure what conditions are really like on these planets.

Gliese 667C is 22 light-years away.

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22 light-years, just next door really.

 

Earth-like planet confirmed

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The planet lies about 15% closer to its star than the Earth is to the Sun

Astronomers have confirmed the existence of an Earth-like planet in the “habitable zone” around a star not unlike our own.

The planet, Kepler 22-b, lies about 600 light-years away and is about 2.4 times the size of Earth, and has a temperature of about 22C.

It is the closest confirmed planet yet to one like ours – an “Earth 2.0”.

However, the team does not yet know if Kepler 22-b is made mostly of rock, gas or liquid.

During the conference at which the result was announced, the Kepler team said that it had spotted some 1,094 new candidate planets.

The Kepler space telescope was designed to look at a fixed swathe of the night sky, staring intently at about 150,000 stars. The telescope is sensitive enough to see when a planet passes in front of its host star, dimming the star’s light by a minuscule amount.

Kepler identifies these slight changes in starlight as candidate planets, which are then confirmed by further observations by Kepler and other telescopes in orbit and on Earth.

Kepler 22-b was one of 54 candidates reported by the Kepler team in February, and is just the first to be formally confirmed using other telescopes.

More of these “Earth 2.0” candidates are likely to be confirmed in the near future, though a redefinition of the habitable zone’s boundaries has brought that number down to 48.

Kepler 22-b lies at a distance from its sun about 15% less than the distance from the Earth to the Sun, and its year takes about 290 days. However, its sun puts out about 25% less light, keeping the planet at its balmy temperature that would support the existence of liquid water.

Source: BBC News Read more

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